Crowns
Crowns
Pressed ceramic crown, Zirconium crown, Metal-ceramic crown

If a tooth is affected by extensive decay or requires root canal treatment, the best way to permanently treat the tooth is to create a crown in order to prevent fracture of the statically weakened tooth. A crown can also be made if we want to correct the shape of the tooth or its axial position. A dental crown is a prosthesis fixed with adhesive that covers the prepared tooth (stump) on all sides in a cap-like manner.

Pressed ceramic crown:

The material the crown is made of is pressed under high pressure, resulting in a mechanically extremely resistant prosthesis whose hardness is comparable to that of titanium. As the whole crown is ceramic, it does not contain a metal frame and therefore has an outstanding aesthetic appearance. The advantage of metal-free crowns is that they do not cause metal allergy, so we recommend them in case of metal sensitivity.

Pressed ceramic crowns are mainly used for the restoration of front teeth, where they are perfectly suited given that their shades match the colour of the teeth. This material is mostly used in standalone crowns. The advantage of pressed ceramic crowns is that they require considerably less tooth material to be removed, the dentist only needs to remove a breath-thin layer.



Treatment process:

Before applying a pressed ceramic porcelain crown, the tooth is prepared under anaesthesia. If necessary, a stump build-up is performed after removal of the parts affected by caries. In the case of root canal treated teeth, a tooth-coloured pin may be bonded in to strengthen the tooth structure.After taking impressions, a dental technician will prepare the prosthesis.It is essential that you are not left without a tooth while therestoration is being prepared: our dentists always provide the prepared tooth with a crown made in the office (with the so-called Scutan method), which is bonded with temporary adhesive until the final prosthesis is ready.

After the pressed ceramic crown is prepared, the crown is tried on. If it is comfortable and suitable in aesthetics, colour, and functionality, the dentist will permanently bond the crown.

Zirconium Crown:

Metal-free zirconia crowns are aesthetic restorations with a similar effect to natural teeth.Due to being metal-free , they do not cause unpleasant allergic symptoms or reactions.A zirconia prosthesis fits perfectly on the prepared tooth thanks to the CAD/CAM machining technology.It is solid, can withstand heavy loads, and thanks to its strong frame is also suitable for bridges and even for restoration of premolars and molars.

Treatment process

At our clinic, metal-free zirconia crowns are applied under painless local anaesthesia. First, the dentist prepares the tooth and then the impression is taken.
It is essential that you are not left without a tooth while therestoration is being prepared: our dentists always provide the prepared tooth with a crown made in the office (with the so-called Scutan method), which is bonded with temporary adhesive until the final prosthesis is ready.
If the crown is comfortable and aesthetically, colourwise and functionally perfect, the dentist will fix it permanently into place.

Metal-ceramic crown:

Metal-ceramic crowns have a metal core and are covered with ceramic.This is the most common type of restoration, mainly due to the fact that it is a less expensive solution than all-ceramic crowns.
It is a porcelain restoration fired onto a thin metal core. Only the porcelain veneer visible, which completely covers the metal.
Metal-ceramic restorations are very durable, but they are aesthetically inferior to all-ceramic and zirconia crowns.

beforeafter

beforeafter



Treatment process

Before applying a metal-ceramic crown, the tooth is prepared under anaesthesia. If necessary, a stump build-up is performed after removal of the parts affected by caries. In the case of root canal treated teeth, a tooth-coloured pin may be bonded in to strengthen the tooth structure.
It is essential that you are not left without a tooth while therestoration is being prepared: our dentists always provide the prepared tooth with a crown made in the office (with the so-called Scutan method), which is bonded with temporary adhesive until the final prosthesis is ready.
If the crown is comfortable and aesthetically, colourwise and functionally perfect, the dentist will fix it permanently into place.

Frequently asked questions

How are pressed ceramic crowns made?

The procedure for applying a crown starts by preparing and grinding the tooth, then impressions are taken of both dental arches.
Based on the impressions, the dental technician prepares a plaster cast of the dental arches, which is then used to make a pressed ceramic crown in the desired shape and size.
During the first session, a temporarily fixed plastic crown is placed on the polished tooth to protect the stump. In the dental laboratory, the tooth of the right colour and shape is created, which is then bonded to the bone after a further check, if the patient is satisfied with the result. If an incisor needs to be replaced, a smile design session is recommended before the restoration is made. At this point, before applying the final pressed ceramic crown, it is possible to apply a trial crown, which is made taking into account the patient’s individual facial character and requests, as well as the rules of facial harmony. The main advantage of this solution is that the patient can try it, show it to his/her family and friends and, if necessary, it can be easily modified until the best possible shape is achieved. Finally, a pressed ceramic crown of the perfect shape and colour is made in the laboratory based on the trial crown.

What materials can be used for crowns?

There are many materials available for crowns today, including some that can be used to create a prosthesis with an appearance that is very similar, aesthetically almost identical to natural teeth. The cheapest of these is the so-called metal-ceramic crown, fully covered with tooth-coloured porcelain, which is mechanically very strong and durable, but aesthetically it is inferior to metal-free solutions, as the grey metal frame makes it almost impossible to achieve the translucency and shades that are typical of natural teeth.
In the case of metal allergy or for aesthetic considerations, a slightly more expensive metal-free prosthesis is recommended. Metal-free crowns can be made of white zirconium core covered with porcelain veneer. This type of crown is also very strong and aesthetically more appealing than metal-ceramics. These crowns are made using so-called CAD/CAM (computer-designed and computer-controlled machining) technology, which results in a crown that is accurate to a thousandth of a millimetre.
The most natural solution is the use of pressed ceramic crowns, as they don’t contain a separate core which would adversely affect the optical properties, and therefore it has a translucency similar to that of natural teeth.

A crown is a fixed prosthesis fixed with adhesive that covers the appropriately prepared tooth (stump) on all sides in a cap-like manner.

When a crown is required, the highest-level aesthetic solution is a pressed ceramic crown, as there is no separate core to adversely affect the optical properties, and therefore it has a translucency similar to that of natural teeth. A further advantage of a pressed ceramic crown is that it is mechanically very stable and strong, and it requires less grinding of the tooth than a zirconium crown or a metal core crown. If you would like a really sophisticated and “invisible” crown, pressed ceramic is the best choice.

How are crowns made?

A crown, like a bridge, starts with preparation of the tooth, followed by impressions taken from both dental arches.
Based on the impressions, the dental technician prepares a plaster cast of the dental arches, and uses it as the basis for accurately shaping the core around which the crown will be built.
In the first session, a temporary plastic crown is fixed on the ground tooth to protect the stump.
Then, the prepared dental crown core is placed on the tooth similarly to a cap to check its accuracy, and we determine the colour of the restoration to be made together with the patient.
Finally, in the dental laboratory, the tooth is layered on a porcelain core to create the correct colour and shape, which is then bonded to the stump after a further check, if the patient is satisfied with the result.
If the crown will be used to restore an incisor, a smile design session is recommended before the crown is built. At this point, it is possible to apply a temporary “test crown” before the final crown, which the patient can try on and show to his/her family and friends.

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